Back in Newport

Clear blue skies. Rippling ocean waves. Cool summer breezes. Relaxed people walking past small shops; others riding boats and taking tours.

I have been dreaming of Newport, Rhode Island for months. I find the summer heat oppressive and draining, so I yearn for cooler temperatures, which always brings my mind to Newport.

But a vacation in Newport was impossible for this year. My father passed away in June and I needed to visit my mother in Providence every chance I could get away. Besides, Newport is extremely expensive. In previous years my family and I took vacations to Newport, but we stayed in nearby Middletown because hotel rates were more reasonable. Of course, we were then forced to drive to Newport where parking on the narrow, congested streets proved difficult. Yet the ocean breezes and comfortable temperatures always beckoned us.

Fortunately, we were able to take the last Friday in July off and visit my mother for the weekend. We were planning to stay at the same Providence hotel but it was all booked. Not only that, but the only days we were able to visit my mother at the nursing home, which was on lockdown, were Friday and Sunday.  I began searching for an alternative hotel when my husband said, “Let’s spend a few nights in Newport.”

“No way!” I said. “Newport is too expensive.”

“Let’s look online to see if we can find a deal.”

The idea immediately took root in my mind and I logged onto the computer. We found a deal but it was still exorbitant compared to what we normally pay, so we continued looking for something better.

The other hotels charged even higher rates.

“Let’s stay in Providence,” I told him.

“No, this has been a tough year. We need to relax and enjoy ourselves.”

I shook my head. “It costs too much.”

“Let’s splurge for once. We need it,” my husband insisted.

I was unconvinced but went back to that original hotel deal by the water and booked it.

When we arrived in Newport, I looked at the water and the sights but could not appreciate them. My father loved Newport and now that he was gone, life seemed to lose all sweetness and excitement.

 But after the first night, we woke up to the shining sun, the people strolling, and the boats sailing. We walked outside and I realized we had made the right decision. Everyone around us was relaxed and in vacation mode.

As tough as this year has been, even though life will never be the same again without my father, the world still held promise and hope.

 Newport brought me back.

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A Study of Contrasts-Dr. Li Wenliang and Ghislaine Maxwell

I am one of those people who tries to understand how people choose to live their lives. Is it in large part because some are basically good and try to help their fellow human beings while other people just care about themselves and are willing to hurt anyone in order to get what they want? In my novel True Mercy, Bruce Hitchens and his son Adam want to do the right thing and help people while the human trafficking smugglers, Igor, Sergei, and Andre, only care about themselves and stop at nothing to achieve their goals, even if it means destroying lives.

An example of a study of contrasts as to how people make these decisions is to examine the lives of Dr. Li Wenliang and Ghislaine Maxwell.

Dr. Li was a 34-year-old dedicated ophthalmologist at the Wuhan Central Hospital. In December of 2019, Dr. Li warned other doctors about the possible spread of an illness with SARS-like symptoms appearing on seven patients from the Huanan Seafood market in Wuhan. They had recently been quarantined at his hospital. His post on WeChat went viral and the alarmed Chinese government quickly sent in the police to warn him that spreading rumors online was forbidden. The following week Dr. Li had a patient suffering from glaucoma but who also had the SARS-like illness, which we now know is the novel coronavirus. Unfortunately, the doctor also contracted the virus and passed away on February 7, 2020. He was married and his widow had their second child in June.

Ghislaine Maxwell is an entirely different story. She is a 58-year-old socialite from England who dedicated her life to supplying and grooming underage girls to her friend, financier Jeffrey Epstein, for sex-trafficking purposes. Her father, the late publishing magnate Robert Maxwell, had robbed his employee’s pension funds to keep his empire afloat. Ghislaine was raised in a 53-room mansion and attended Oxford University. In 1991, she moved to the United States. Craving the lifestyle she was accustomed to but lost when her father’s empire went under, she decided to make a living by finding three girls a day so pedophile Jeffrey Epstein could sexually abuse them. She has recently been arrested and is now in prison awaiting trial.

Who knows why people make the decisions they do? Although it is an eternal question, one thing is certain: it is always a privilege to have good, sincere people in our lives. As for the opposite, the best we can do if they come near is to run in the opposite direction.

References

  1. Bociurkiw, Michael (11 February 2020). “China’s hero doctor was punished for telling truth about coronavirus” (https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/08/opinions/coronavirus-bociurkiw/index.html) Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  2. Hegarty, Stephanie (6 February 2020) “The Chinese doctor who tried to warn others about coronavirus” (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-51364382) Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  3. Vincent, Isabel (18 July 2020). “Ghislaine Maxwell was ‘a sexual predator,’ alleged victim says in new testimony” (https://nypost.com/2020/07/18/ghislaine-maxwell-was-a-sexual-predator-alleged-victim-says) Retrieved 20 July 2020.
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A Deep, Sad Loss

On June 25, 2020 my life changed forever. My beloved father, Stanley S. Kaplan, passed away at 91. He was a major influence and inspiration in my life, always guiding and supporting me, even when I was at my lowest. It is ironic that in my new novel, I write a detailed scene of children losing their devoted father and I am actually experiencing the same heartbreak in real life. I must now learn to continue living without having him to turn to.

I have so many memories: his optimism and encouragement, his devotion to my mother during their sixty-year marriage, and his unending care and concern for me and my sisters. When I was very young my father would take me to what he referred to as “the secret place” because we never told anyone where we went. It would be a visit to the park and afterwards, he would take me out for ice cream. My father had read that it was difficult to be a middle child, so he would occasionally take me out alone to make sure I was getting enough attention. And after I was married, I had a difficult pregnancy because I was carrying twins. My husband was working long hours and I couldn’t be alone, so my parents picked me up from New Jersey and I stayed with them in Rhode Island. Since my twins were born premature and I needed time to recover, my parents attended classes at the hospital to learn about premature babies.

His kindness did not stop with his family. One time while growing up we were traveling to a Cape Cod vacation and ate in a restaurant. As we were driving away, my father realized that he forgot to leave the waitress a tip. He turned around on the highway to return to the restaurant. On his obituary page, a neighbor wrote that when he lost his own father at a very young age, my father would invite him over to lift weights and was always very kind to him. And a cousin of mine recently told me that my father treated him more like a grandson than a cousin, and whenever he and his mother came to visit, my father gave him toys when he was young and advice as he grew older.

Dad, I will carry your love and goodness in my heart forever.

Idelle Kursman is the author of two novels: True Mercy and more recently, The Book of Revelations.

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Two Reviews for The Book of Revelations

I am proud to receive two reviews for my new novel!

One is from Amy Shannon, a noted book reviewer who runs the website Amy’s Bookshelf Reviews. I highly recommend her site for reviews on a wide variety of books. Amy wrote the following:

“Kursman pens a magnificent story in The Book of Revelations. I have read work from this author before, and I really enjoyed it. The characters were intense and very intriguing. This book deserves a second read! (and maybe more). The thrills and intrigue is written clearly and the characterizations are engrossing. It’s a powerful read, and so intense, with both heart break and heart fulfillment. This definitely kept this reader turning the pages. It’s a great story to follow and try to figure out what will happen next. This author’s characters develop and interacts well with the other characters. I have fast become a big fan of (this author). I look forward to reading more by this author. This book is a definite recommendation by Amy’s Bookshelf Reviews.”

The second is from Diane Donovan, an editor who runs Donovan’s Literary Services. Diane also writes reviews for Midwest Book Review, a highly regarded as well as affordable book review site. Diane herself offers an array of services for writers seeking help to improve their writing. She wrote the following about The Book of Revelations:

“In The Book of Revelations, Christine Goldberg has struggled for a large part of her life to get to the successful point she enjoys today, with a family, a good job, and security. All this is threatened by the emergence of an ex-boyfriend who is in search of the apex role in his acting career, the only thing that thus far has remained elusive to him. 

Ryan Monti is fixated on his goal, shallow, self-centered, and a part of her past that Christine didn’t want exposed. He’s also successful. His success hasn’t led to contentment, but to an obsession which has led him to being considered one of Hollywood’s shining stars. 

When blackmail enters the picture to complicate Ryan’s life, his uncertain relationship with girlfriend Megan, and his reconnection with Christine, it throws them both together despite their feelings about the past, and everything begins to change. 

Idelle Kursman builds a fine story where the past intersects with the present in two very different lives and personas. She paints a fine portrait of Christine, who faces life with the professional demeanor of a businesswoman with more savvy and independence than her younger self; and Ryan, whose personality hasn’t veered much from his obsessions and uncertainties even as he’s cultivated uncommon success in his life. 

Ryan’s feelings about reporters mirrors his casual use-them-and-drop-them attitude about everything in his life, from his girlfriends to his colleagues: ‘Ryan had no real relationships with other journalists or anyone else in the media. He considered them a nuisance and always tried to avoid them by wearing a hat, sunglasses, and nondescript clothing in public.‘ 

At first, it’s hard to see the connections between these two disparate individuals aside from their early encounter. The surprise lies in their evolution and shared revelation over a closely-held secret that holds the power to change Ryan’s life like nothing else. Ryan grows and changes throughout the story, finally developing into the man he should have been all along. 

The Book of Revelations explores different kinds of revelations, confrontations, and changes. It considers how one door opens as another is still closing, and explores changed concepts of family connections, trust, and truth. 

Readers interested in a chronicle of lies, truths, and revised lives will find The Book of Revelations an emotional ride into the choices and consequences of two disparate individuals who find their lives coming full circle in unexpected ways. It’s highly recommended reading for those who like to see their characters evolve later in life, and for readers who know that no story is set in stone until the end of life.”  

I would like to thank Amy Shannon and Diane Donovan for their wonderful reviews and support! Readers, don’t forget to check out Amy’s Bookshelf Reviews and writers, please consider using Donovan’s Literary Services. I highly recommend both of their work!

The Book of Revelations is available on Amazon in print and ebook.

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New Review of True Mercy

I am very excited to post Amy Shannon’s recent review of my first novel, True Mercy:

Kursman pens a magnificent story in True Mercy. I haven’t read anything from this author before, and I really enjoyed this story. The characters were intense and very real. The author’s writing style is perfect for this story. Reader, enter the despicable world of the sex-slave trade. It’s an intense story about survival and caring, and the addition of an autistic character, makes this story both poignant, and interesting. This book deserves a second read! (and maybe more). The author’s technique of intense characters and great plotlines is a gift. It’s a great story to follow and try to figure out what will happen next. This author’s characters develop and interacts well with the other characters. I look forward to reading more by this author. This book is definitely highly recommended by Amy’s Bookshelf Reviews. A very powerful, raw and gritty read, with high emotions and aptly placed humor and reality.

I received this book free in exchange for an honest and unbiased review. ~Amy’s Bookshelf Reviews

Thank you, Amy!

http://writeramyshannon.wixsite.com/bookshelfreviews/top10

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